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Sanil Sachar

Sanil Sachar is an author, entrepreneur, motivational speaker and movie producer from New Delhi. He is also the founder of coworking incubation centre, “Huddle”, and co-owner of TRUSOX, a company that promotes sports.

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Leadership Lessons from a Stranger

Teamwork is like a boomerang. If practiced correctly, it will go a long way, in an effective manner and come back to you.

Photo Credit : businessingmag.com,

We often read leadership books to find inspiration, listen to podcasts to stay motivated and watch documentaries to grow. It took ten seconds for a stranger to give me all three and more.

Lessons to last (beyond) a lifetime. 

We are all one step away from every opportunity conquered and every chance we unknowingly ignore. The value of a moment isn’t felt until it passes and the appreciation of the past is seen as a waste of time.

We believe everything we see, yet we doubt ourselves to be unbelievable way too often. In a world filled with constant updates, lives aren’t getting busy, they’re becoming over-crowded. Filled with alerts, pings, vibrations, flashing lights and seldom, the voice of another human. Our head is constantly turning in circles when the only way forward is in front us. The present has become a closer cousin of the past, as it’s often overlooked while we are living it and always reminisced as a moment that once was. Almost like we are fighting each action to lead to the next, without realising the importance of this definite moment. 

Nothing makes me an appropriate preacher for a practice I work towards making a habit. Neither is this rooted from a unique epiphany. All this stands for is the power we have, the importance of our actions and the impact of our decisions.

It feels like yesterday when I found myself sitting open wounded, exposing my sorrow while waiting for a tube during the busiest schedule for the London Underground. Amidst a sea-filled with daily travelers, I felt most comfortable to face my discomfort. No mirror to reflect the crevices from the frown on my face, the rush hour entertained isolated minds packed in a crowded tunnel.

Just then, a man came to, he didn’t ask me what was wrong, he didn’t suggest that I smile and neither did he push me aside to take my spot. With his hand on my shoulder, he looked me in the eyes, his hazelnut pupils gazing straight into my misty eyes and said, ‘Why do we take happiness to be a mere moment but adopt sadness as a lifestyle? Why can’t we see it the other way around and enjoy everything we have this second.’

Timed impeccably his words left his mouth as the tube approached the station, leading to a tsunami of impatient travelers, shuffling into a compartment that fit more than it was designed for. As the touch of his hand left my shoulder, he got mixed in the crowd like winters mist. Nowhere to be seen, while everyone should have heard him, his words resonated in my ears, making their way up to the part of the body that is accustomed to ask more questions and provide fewer answers.

Thee stops away from my destination, the man unknowingly reminded me of three leadership rules, for life in all its forms -

Overthinking is a common phenomenon that presents itself when we doubt ourselves. But if we have the courage to begin, then we should have the endurance to continue with same vigor and increased passion.

Simply because when you think about stopping, all you need to do is, remember why you started in the first place.

2. While all actions should be as important as the other then so should reactions. We focus heavily on what made us happy forgetting to focus on the formula (simply how we got there). Yet when we are unhappy, we focus mainly on the ‘why’, having self-pity on ourselves, in order to shy away from any responsibility when the going gets tough.

Be the captain of your ship and take accountability for your actions.

3. Give without wanting to get. Creations, be it a product, a service, thoughts turned into words, anything created, should be shared, with no intention of the act being reciprocated. Reach out if you need assistance and be approachable for those who might hesitate to reach you.

Teamwork is like a boomerang. If practiced correctly, it will go a long way, in an effective manner and come back to you.

As humans, we underestimate the impact our actions can have and as a result the world misses out on the results we can provide. A strange act by a stranger made me realise not what we don’t know but what we tend to forget.

It takes one word, one step and one action of yours to get one word, one step and one action out of another, and put together, this never-ending domino effect will create beyond measure.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the article above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this publishing house


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