Javascript on your browser is not enabled.

Advertisement

Rajesh Rao

Rajesh Rao is Founder & CEO at Connecting The Dots.

More From The Author >>

Education Sector- The Year Gone by and Positive Outlook for 2018

In the coming years, education industry should look at structuring itself in such a way that it prepares the next generation with the skills they’ll need to survive and thrive once they enter the workforce. Our Education system needs to prepare students to think and adapt.

Photo Credit : ShutterStock,

The yearly round up of the Education sector in India for 2017 is quite grim. According to the ‘World Development Report 2018: ‘Learning to Realize Education’s Promise’, India ranks second after Malawi in a list of 12 countries, wherein a grade two student could not read a single word of a short text or perform two-digit subtraction. The schooling system in India today continues to focus rigidly on memorization rather than on nourishing intellectual creativity. This deficiency is even more pronounced as benchmark studies by TIMSS and PIRLS suggest, creating a skills deficit and making graduates non-competitive and/or unemployable in the jobs market.

The positives were that there is a lot of education focus in CSR activities of various companies. It is one of the top spend areas among companies according to most surveys. But that spend was largely focused on non-academic activities (focusing on infrastructure building in schools, distribution of bags, books etc) rather than on improving the quality of education in the K-12 space.  In the past year, we have witnessed a huge explosion in the digital content space with Digital Digitization the trending key word influencing inclusion of digital content in the learning modules in schools.

But still there is still a lot to be fixed in the current education system in our country.  There has been a short supply of content that addresses middle schools,which have been largely ignored. From here on the gaps begin to appear which has long has long reaching effects. Despite the proliferation of huge content, syllabus continues to very dry and not fun for students. Simultaneously, teacher training is entirely missing as a focus area from CSR initiatives. Very few programs exist to assist teachers. The formal colleges offering B.Ed focus entirely on pedagogy with the assumption that subject matter expertise is present. This assumption, for the most part, is incorrect. Also the quality of teachers entering the profession seems to be dropping. The primary reasons for choosing the profession seem to be for “convenience". This compromises the quality of teaching in the classroom. The enormous effort and money spent by government and private agencies on teacher training have limited impact because the quality of talent entering the teaching profession is suspect.

In 2017, not much has changed. 

Positive Outlook for 2018

In 2018, innovative companies will focus on addressing these issues. In making science education effective, it is very necessary to have questions and answers type of model of teaching. Interactive models should take centre stage in 2018. Also there is the expectation that government spends on GDP will increase from the current 3.71% to get on par with other developing countries.  There is also hope that educational institutions will continue to move towards truly integrated learning platform. These will in improved learning through data-driven technology that helps deliver a personalized experience to every learner, regardless of geography or ability.Play-based curriculum should be encouraged and should be a major focus in 2018. It lets children take the lead in exploring and asking open-ended questions that ultimately cause them to reflect on their actions, form theories and begin thinking strategically.

In the coming years, education industry should look at structuring itself in such a way that it prepares the next generation with the skills they’ll need to survive and thrive once they enter the workforce. Our Education system needs to prepare students to think and adapt.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the article above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this publishing house


Tags assigned to this article:
education sector

Around The World

Advertisement